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Plantar Fasciitis 
Inflammation of the foot's plantar fascia

Pronounced "PLAN-ter fash-ee-EYE-tus" is the most common cause of a pain in your heel.

The plantar fascia is the flat band of tissue (called a ligament) that connects your heel bone to your toes. It supports the arch of your foot. It's made of collagen, a rigid protein that's not very stretchy

Normally, the plantar fascia acts like a shock absorber supporting the arch in your foot. If tension becomes too much, it can create small tears in the ligament. Repetitive stretching and tearing can cause the fascia to become irritated or inflamed. Thus the "–itis" of fasciitis. (-itis means inflammation)

Symptoms

Plantar fasciitis causes a stabbing pain in the bottom of your foot near the heel. Pain is usually worst in the morning with the first few steps after waking up. It can also be triggered by long periods of standing or getting up from sitting. It is most common between the ages of 40 to 60.

Causes

Activities that place a lot of stress on your heel and its attached tissues such as long-distance running, ballet dancing and aerobics can contribute to its onset.

With runner’s, plantar fasciitis tends to strike those who over train, neglect to stretch their calf muscles, or overdo hill work and speed work.

Plantar fasciitis can also be caused by biomechanical flaws, including flat, high-arched feet and a tight Achilles tendon. It can be caused by sudden increases in training mileage; wearing worn running shoes; running on hard surfaces, like asphalt or concrete; or wearing high heels all day and then switching into flat running shoes.

Being flat-footed, having a high arch or even having an abnormal pattern of walking can affect the way your weight is distributed when standing and puts added stress on this ligament.

Excess pounds can put extra stress on your plantar fascia.

Occupations that enforce you to stand for a long time – Factory workers, teachers and others that walk and stand on hard services can damage this ligament.

If you change the way you walk to minimize the problem, you might also develop foot, knee, hip or back problems.

Ignoring this may result in chronic heel pain that hinders your regular activities.

Plantar Fasciitis Medical Treatment: Treatment consists of orthotics, foot taping, cortisone injections, night splints, and anti-inflammatories. These will decrease symptoms significantly in about 95 percent of sufferers within six weeks. For more stubborn cases, physical therapy may be prescribed; six months of chronic pain may benefit from shock-wave therapy, an FDA-approved plantar-fasciitis treatment.




RECOMMENDED:

Watch this very short video on how to help this problem. Most people go to their health care practitioner month after month.  Find out the exercises for plantar fasciitis that you can do yourself. 

Watch this video by Dr. Berg  Cure for Plantar Fasciitis 

 


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