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Gallbladder, Gallstones & Gallbladder Sludge

Tell me about Gallstones

What to do if your gallbladder has already been removed

Gallbladder:  a membranous muscular sac in which bile from the liver is stored — called also cholecyst

The gallbladder is a small four inch long, pear-shaped sack located between the liver lobes directly under the liver. (see photo)  A small Y-shaped duct, called the common bile duct, carries bile from both the gallbladder and the liver to the small intestines.   The gallbladder's job is to store and to concentrate bile which the liver produces.  
Diagram of the Liver, Gallbladder and Bile Duct
When fats are taken into the digestive system, a hormone is secreted which cause the gallbladder to contract, thus releasing the bile into the stomach and small intestine. The bile's job is help food digestion by working on digested fats. Lecithin in the bile dissolves this fat into droplets so small that the enzymes can surround them and process them so they can pass through the intestinal wall into the blood which takes it to the cells where you body can use it.

Bile is a green blend which contains water, lecithin, acids, cholesterol, bile salts, and  minerals.  Bile is vital to health. 

Inadequate Bile Flow

Trouble starts when the diet is too high in refined sugar and starches and fats and too low in protein. When too little bile is formed by the liver and when  the gall bladder is too "lazy" (due to nutritional deficiencies) to empty its content, the fat can not  be readily absorbed.  

When not absorbed,  the fat then unites with calcium and iron from food (stopping these minerals from entering the blood where they can do some good), and forms a hard soap, then forms hard packed fecal matter and causes constipation.   

This persistent stealing of essential iron and calcium can bring on iron-deficiency anemia, osteoporosis (honeycombed bones) or osteomalacia (week and caving-in bones).   

Without enough bile, fats, which quickly melt at body temperature, cover the carbohydrates and proteins that is also being digested, making it hard to continue the digestion process. 

Then bacteria attack this partially digested mess, bringing on gas and discomfort, contributing to an smelly bowel movement and an equally foul breath.  Much of the undigested food is usually lost in the stools.  Poor elimination associated with gall bladder problems invariably indicates a major loss of vital minerals. 

Because the lack of bile acids prevents the absorption of  vitamin A, D, E, & K, and whatever fat has been broken down,  deficiencies are produced.    People with insufficient bile flow are usually so deficient in vitamin A that they have difficulty in driving a car at night, sewing, or doing other close work.   

Although a low fat diet is recommended to decrease these digestive problems (it keeps the gall bladder quiet until healing has occurred), when the gall bladder has to be removed  obviously a low fat diet cannot rectify this situation or increase the absorption of needed vitamins.  

There is a peril of a low-fat or no-fat diet.  (See Low Fat Foods)

Gall bladder sludge: Also called, biliary sludge, can be looked upon as a condition of microscopic gallstones,  although it is not clear at what size the particles should be considered gallstones. 

Gall bladder sludge  is composed of calcium salts and cholesterol crystals. Unless you flush it from your system quickly, it can lead to gallstones, or worse, painful pancreatitis and inflammation of the gallbladder. If it isn't resolved, surgical removal of the gallbladder is sometimes recommended by medical doctors. 

Gall bladder sludge can develop after fasting, rapid weight loss, certain medication, a high cholesterol level, drug or alcohol damage,  or pregnancy. 

Symptoms include pain in the abdomen, nausea, and vomiting just like gallstones.

Sick Gallbladder (contracted Gallbladder):

A contracted gallbladder is not normal and indicates that your gallbladder needs support.  It is not functioning correctly.

What do you do for a "sick" gallbladder? You get the body to build a healthy gallbladder. You do that by supplying it with the nutrients that the body needs to build a healthy gallbladder. Bodies are designed to create energy and repair itself given the right tools that it needs (nutrients).

There are different formulas you can take as well as changing your diet.

You can also see a nutritionist who can test you and supply you with the exact nutrients your body needs. Your "sick gallbladder" may be a symptom of your liver needing help, or just a problem with the gallbladder itself. Hard to say. You can find a nutritionist near you on this page. http://mcvitamins.com/find-a-nutritionist.htm 

You do have choices.


1)  Eat a high fiber diet.  Eat more beans and fresh fruits and vegetables each day.  You can add oat bran to your cereal. 

2) Drink six to eight glasses of water a day.  It flushes the liver and dilutes the bile secretions that lead to gallstones. 

3)  Green juices.  Spinach, parsley - these are rich in chlorophyll, a pigment that has a natural cleansing effect.  An eight ounce blend of two ounces of green juice and two ounces of carrot juice, diluted with an equal amount of water.   You can also find fresh vegetable juices with this combo at your health food store such as Whole Foods

Gallbladder Symptoms:

Here are some "hidden" symptoms that you probably aren't aware of   In this video Dr. Berg tells you why they are symptoms.

The gallbladder is a very important organ.  It is NOT an extra body part that you can do without as you will soon discover.  Symptoms include: low thyroid, headaches, right shoulder pain to bloating, low vitamin D and even high cholesterol.

See Hidden Gallbladder Symptoms


For Sludge & faulty gallbladder function. 

Build a healthy gallbladder:

Cholacol II:  Cholacol II supports healthy fat digestion:

  • Supports the body's normal removal of toxins

  • Source of bile salts

  • Supports gallbladder function

  • Helps enzymes break down fats, which can help with discomfort after eating a fatty meal

  • Supports healthy elimination.

To Order: Standard Process Cholacol II 90 T



What about Gallstones?

If you've had your Gallbladder Removed -  read what to do about the problems 


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